5 Ways Veganism Transformed My Life

brilliant sunset over dunes and ocean
Photo by Angela Crawford, Cape May Point, NJ

I have always tended to be an introvert.  I relish solitude.  I prefer small groups to large crowds.  I’ve lived a quiet life, not often sharing my views and opinions publicly.

But then 15 years ago, I had an awakening that was so meaningful, compelling, and life-changing, it has continued to impact me and to make me more fully human, more fully me.  It revealed my deeply held values.  And over time, I came to realize that these values are universal and encompass our physical health, emotional and spiritual well-being, and the survival of the planet.  No longer could I keep this to myself as a private revelation.  I realized that I had to find a way to share this life-changing discovery.

My awakening happened in stages.  It started with learning about factory farming and the treatment of animals. I realized I would never want a dog or cat to go through that suffering.  Why was it okay for a pig, cow, or chicken?

I read everything I could, filling my Kindle with e-books on vegan topics.  Through my research, I learned about the healing benefits of a plant-based diet for many diseases that plague Western society. I also learned about the devastating effects of animal agriculture on the planet.

But I was most impacted by the suffering of animals treated as commodities rather than sentient beings.  Gradually, I broke through the deep layers of social conditioning that kept me emotionally disconnected from their plight.

Much to my surprise, becoming vegan did not seem like a sacrifice.  Rather, it turned out to be an experience of abundance and fulfillment, transforming my life in unexpected ways.

1. Veganism inspired me to find my voice

Veganism connected so many dots for me.  I wake with a deep sense of purpose each day.  Through my daily food choices, and my efforts to educate and raise awareness, I can be part of the solution for many causes that matter deeply to me: caring for animals and the planet, food insecurity, justice, and human health. Although I still think of myself as an introvert, my passion for veganism compels me to discover how I can use my voice and my gifts to make a difference.

2. Extending compassion to all beings

I have always viewed myself as an empathic person.  However, for years I ate meat daily, and was seemingly unaware of the animals who suffered as a result of my choices.  When I had my vegan awakening, I became aware of my connection with all life.  I developed a deeper appreciation for the complexity and beauty of nature and the animal kingdom.  Gradually, I realized that the kindest way of living and eating was also healthiest for me.

Recent visit at Farm Sanctuary

3. Greater peace 

There was a sense of freedom, a weight lifted, when I began living in a way that was truly aligned with my values.  An inner conflict that I had not even been fully aware of was resolved through the choice to not eat animals.  This brought a sense of peace and inner wholeness.

4. Appreciation and gratitude

My world opened to greater abundance and appreciation when I became vegan.   Yes, there is awareness of pain and suffering that is very difficult at times. But there is also an expanded sense of awe of nature and all life.  There are the delicious vegan meals I’ve learned to create, with vibrant colors and delectable flavors.  And there is appreciation for my body’s resilience and health, which has been strengthened by my plant-powered cuisine.

5. Connecting with like-hearted people across the globe

I have had the amazing experience of connecting with vegans around the world.  Through groups, collaborations, and trainings, I have met courageous and compassionate people from across the globe.

There are challenges being vegan in a world that is not yet vegan.  As someone who prefers harmony, it has not always been easy to live in a way that is at odds with the status quo.  And yet each time I meet others who embrace and live by vegan values, I feel inspired and uplifted.  And each time my example inspires someone else to consider the vegan path, it makes it all worthwhile.

Veganism is a path of listening to our heart’s guidance to extend kindness to all beings.  Through our daily choices, we join others to become a movement that seeks a world of compassion, sustainability, and flourishing for all.

Note: This article was originally published on Main Street Vegan Blog on November 23, 2021.

Angela Crawford, Ph.D. is a psychologist and transformational coach. She is passionate about empowering people to create lives that nurture mind, body, spirit, and planet. Dr. Crawford is certified as a Master Vegan Lifestyle Coach and Educator, and has a Plant-Based Nutrition certificate from the T. Colin Campbell Center for Nutrition Studies at e-Cornell. She is currently doing research for a book on the psychological and emotional benefits of a vegan lifestyle.

Enjoying a Vegan Thanksgiving

Wild turkey with beautiful plumage
Photo by Randy Fath on Unsplash

I have to acknowledge that Thanksgiving Day is not always easy for me as a vegan.  When I adopted a plant-based diet 15 years ago, it changed how I viewed Thanksgiving and what this holiday means to me.  I feel sad about the lives of animals lost for this one meal, especially when there are so many delicious, plant-based, cruelty-free alternatives.  

I still look forward to the shared meal with family.  But now my scrumptious dishes are made from the plant kingdom.  And I try to view this day as a celebration of values such as compassion, appreciation, and gratitude.

Here are some ideas for enjoying a compassionate Thanksgiving:

  • Rather than eating a turkey, “adopt” oneFarm Sanctuary (which has shelters in New York State and California) offers the option of symbolically adopting a rescued turkey by making a small donation.  The funds provide food and care for turkeys living at the shelter.  Farm Sanctuary sends a certificate that includes a picture and the story of your adopted turkey. 
  • Enjoy an abundant feast from the plant kingdom.  For the Thanksgiving meal, I like to bring vegan versions of traditional favorites.  This year, my husband and I will be contributing roasted garlic mashed potatoes and parsnips; shitake mushroom gravy; sweet potato biscuits; cranberry-orange relish; maple-glazed Brussels sprouts; and chocolate “cream” pie.  There are many great vegan Thanksgiving recipes available on-line.  Here are a few websites to check out:
  • Consider a meat alternative.  Gardein, Tofurky, and Field Roast offer plant-based holiday roasts you can enjoy.  These options can provide a satisfying centerpiece to the meal.  (This year, we are going to try Field Roast which comes with sage stuffing and porcini mushroom gravy).
  • Connect with your reasons for eating plant-based.  Some of us go plant-based for health, others for ethical or environmental reasons.  I was influenced by all of these considerations, but have stayed committed due to compassion for all sentient beings.  Approximately 46 million turkeys are bred and killed each year in the US for Thanksgiving alone.  Commercially raised turkeys are bred to be much heavier than wild turkeys, live in confined conditions, and are slaughtered at only 12 to 19 weeks old.  Taking in these realities (and discovering the abundance of delicious, healthy plant-based options) made me realize that I no longer wanted or needed to participate in this. 
  • Consider what Thanksgiving means to you.  Take time to explore your deeper meaning for the Thanksgiving holiday.  Many of us follow old traditions out of habit, rather than making a conscious decision about how we want to enjoy our holidays.  This year may be a perfect year to reevaluate your holidays, what they mean to you, and how you want to celebrate them.  Maybe you will want to keep some old traditions, modify others, and create new ones.
  • Practice gratitude.  I am reminding myself this Thanksgiving to appreciate all the blessings in my life, and to share that appreciation with others.  Even in the midst of what is a challenging time for so many, we all have reasons for gratitude.  In addition, there are many health and psychological benefits of making a daily practice of acknowledging our blessings.
  • Make kind and compassionate purchases.  One way of appreciating our blessings is to pass them on to others.  In addition to donating time or money to causes that we care about, we can extend compassion to sentient beings and to workers by researching fair trade, cruelty-free, sustainable, and health-promoting choices for our food and gift purchases.  Our decision to extend compassion to others is a win-win situation, because ultimately it brings more health, fulfillment, and joy back to us.

WISHING YOU AND YOUR LOVED ONES A HEALTHY, JOYFUL, AND COMPASSIONATE THANKSGIVING!

Note:  This article was revised and updated from Vegan Thanksgiving published on 11/25/2020

Angela Crawford, Ph.D. is a psychologist, transformational coach, and vegan lifestyle educator.